Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Lake Powell and so much more!
Encompassing over 1.25 million acres, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area offers unparalleled opportunities for water-based & backcountry recreation. The recreation area stretches for hundreds of miles from Lees Ferry in Arizona to the Orange Cliffs of southern Utah, encompassing scenic vistas, geologic wonders, and a vast panorama of human history.

Your Glen Canyon Adventure Starts Here
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, at the heart of the “Grand Circle,” provides unique and refreshing opportunities for travel-weary visitors. Stay for an hour and take a tour of Glen Canyon Dam, or stay for a week to camp on the shores of Lake Powell in a houseboat. With 1.2 million acres of golden cliffs, lush hanging gardens, impossibly narrow slot canyons, and the brilliant blue paradox of Lake Powell to visit, you may find yourself coming back again and again. But if this is going to be your first visit to Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, these pages on your left can help you to plan your amazing Glen Canyon adventure.
Glen Canyon can be treacherous! Take care of yourself. Your safety is our first concern.

Horseshoe Bend
Horseshoe Bend is the name for a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near Page, Arizona.  It is located five miles (8.5 km) downstream from the Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, about four miles or six km southwest of Page. Horseshoe Bend can be viewed from the steep cliff above. The overlook is 4,200 feet above sea level and the Colorado River is at 3,200 feet above sea level making it a breathtaking 1,000 foot drop. It is a short ¾ of a mile hike from US Route 89.

Explore Five More

Horseshoe Bend (10 min)
Absolutely worth the walk; the view of Horseshoe Bend from the rim of the canyon is extraordinary. (You’ll need a wide-angle lens to get the entire scene in your picture!)

Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (45 min)
In the 1870s, geologist Clarence Dutton first conceptualized this region as a huge stairway; the Grand Staircase is an immense sequence of rock layers that stretch south from Bryce Canyon National Park through Zion National Park and into the Grand Canyon.

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (1.5 hours)
This 280,000-acre Monument is a geologic treasure, containing a variety of diverse landscapes from the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. Elevations range from 3,100 to 7,100 feet.

Grand Canyon, North Rim (1.75 hours)
Unique combinations of geologic color and erosional forms decorate a canyon that is 277 river miles (446km) long, up to 18 miles (29km) wide, and a mile (1.6km) deep. Grand Canyon overwhelms our senses through its immense size.

Rainbow Bridge National Monument (3 hours by boat)
Rainbow Bridge is one of the world’s largest known natural bridges. The span has undoubtedly inspired people throughout time–from the neighboring American Indian tribes who consider Rainbow Bridge sacred, to the 85,000 people who visit it each year.